what does safe mean to you?

¿Qué significa seguro para ti?

JUST SAFE

SOLO SEGURO

“Just Safe” is a movement to redefine what safety means for all communities. Let’s invest in prevention and healing for everyone.

“Just Safe” es un movimiento para redefinir lo que significa seguridad en nuestra comunidad. Invirtamos en prevención y sanación para todos.

what we
can do

We know what solutions work to make our communities safe. Over-enforcement and incarceration don’t keep us safe. Providing support for victims, mental health, addiction treatment, healing, and housing do.

We’re fighting to redefine what safety means for all Californians. With our platform, we’re reaching the hearts and minds of our community to invest in a safe future. That means fighting to:

build safe neighborhoods

Building local partnerships to scale up solutions that keep communities safe.

Mobilize Communities

Bringing in and uplifting the voices most impacted to be part of the solutions.

Impact Policies

Removing barriers and increasing investments in community-based programs.

Tell us what safe means to you.
Join The Movement
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s
California spends
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$50 Billion

$50 Billion

on its criminal justice system.
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MENTAL HEALTH

Vinny’S STORY

Vinny is a community organizer based in California. He has been involved in the activism world for over a decade and has been a part of several survivor-led coalitions to advance dignity and support families impacted by police violence.

Ten years ago, Vinny’s sister Jazmyne was unjustly killed by four police officers in the waiting room of a mental health clinic while she was experiencing a crisis. Her death inspired him to fight for safe solutions.

Problem
13 million Californians live in a mental health and substance abuse treatment desert with no resources.
Solution
Provide access to appropriate mental health professionals by redirecting 20% of emergency calls to trauma-informed crisis units instead of to the police.
I want to try to make sure that no other family ever has to go through this experience.
REENTRY SERVICES

INGRID’s STORY

As a survivor of domestic violence and a formerly incarcerated person, Ingrid is a single mom who uses her story to inspire others to create positive change. Ingrid shared that finding her confidence is an important part of being able to feel safe.

Problem
People recently released from prison are 11.5 times more likely to experience homelessness than others.
Solution
Providing critical support resources such as housing and employment makes it possible for people leaving the justice system to successfully and safely reenter their communities.
Victim Compensation

Laura’s STORY

When Laura’s son Sean was fatally shot by police in June 2020, she and her two daughters fought for over two years to bring justice to his memory. The officer who pulled the trigger was fired in October 2022, allowing Laura and her family to feel like things were finally starting to move forward in the fight for justice.

Problem
96% of victims of violent crimes received zero compensation or support to help them recover.
Solution
Trauma Recovery Centers can help victims process their experiences with violent crime. These centers report up to a 38% decrease in PTSD symptoms. People supported by these centers are also more likely to apply for victim compensation and are 56% more likely to return to work.
FACTS & FIGURES
Voters support reducing incarceration for people determined to be low risk to public safety in order to close prisons and reduce the incarceration budget by

$1 billion.

PREVENTION

ELIZABETH’S STORY

Elizabeth is a project consultant on adult and juvenile justice system reform efforts. Elizabeth was formerly the Director of Rehabilitative Programs at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. While in that position, she oversaw education, substance abuse treatment, and other rehabilitative programs for the state’s incarceration and parole systems.

Problem
Most violence interventions only happen after violence occurs, and those responses rarely prevent repeat instances of violence.
Solution
Reallocate a portion of the state’s budget to employ 10,000 violence prevention workers who will offer mentorship, positive social connections, employment pathways, and opportunities to experience stability.
I feel the most safe when we see each other.
When we are connected.
I feel the most safe when we see each other.
When we are connected.
FAMILY Healing

GILBERT and joshua’s STORY

Gilbert Johnson serves as ASJ’s California TimeDone Manager, working to build safer communities by eliminating barriers to success and increasing economic stability for millions of people living with arrest records and convictions. He works with thousands of previously incarcerated individuals and system-impacted families to change laws, change records, and change the narrative about people living with old records. Gilbert is a perfect example of the positive change that can occur when you give people struggling with addiction, gang involvement, and criminal convictions the chance to grow and excel.

Problem
We’d never taken the time to heal and have healthy dialogue amongst my family. That just wasn’t common in my household.”
Solution
I’ve seen the community-first approach work. I know from first-hand experience what works, and it’s not how the system has operated historically.”
Safety is when we don’t lack anything — we have everything that we need; we are safe in all aspects of life.
Trauma Recovery

Serafín’s STORY

In 1986, Serafín experienced loss when his mentor and brother were murdered in the streets of Los Angeles. In a state of grief, Serafín began to run into trouble with the law. After serving close to five years of his adolescence behind concrete walls, Serafín recognized a cycle of violence.

Today, Serafín is passionate about giving back to the California community. He has worked for several community-based organizations and nonprofits including Taller San José, The Boys & Girls Club, The City of Santa Ana, Canyon Acres-Wraparound, and more.

Problem
California has 146 adult jails and prisons, but only 21 Trauma Recovery Centers.
Solution
Invest in new and existing Trauma Recovery Centers to better serve Californians. Victims supported by a Trauma Recovery Center show a 74% improvement in mental health and a 51% improvement in physical health.
Safety is when we don’t lack anything — we have everything that we need; we are safe in all aspects of life.
SUBSTANCE TREATMENT

DAVID’S STORY

David was 10 years old when he lost his brother to a murder in 1983. No one told him what happened, and David struggled in his teen years with fear and anger about the loss. After decades of drug and alcohol addiction, David became clean and sober.

In 2012, loss struck David’s family again when another one of his brothers was killed. David helped his family navigate this ordeal and has developed first-hand expertise in the needs people have after experiencing trauma.

Problem
90% of Californians who need addiction treatment are not receiving it.
Solution
Trauma Recovery Centers report a 52% decrease in alcohol use in their population.
If you or someone you know is struggling with substance abuse, please contact SAMHSA National Helpline Confidential for assistance. Learn more at 1-800-662-4357.
SHARED SAFETY

Marisa’s STORY

As the CSJ California Innovations Director and originator of the phrase “Safety is more than the absence of crime, it is the presence of wellbeing,” Marisa works with crime survivors, system leaders, and community advocates across California to advance Shared Safety—a framework of principles and practices that cities can use to reimagine community safety.

Marisa joined Californians for Safety and Justice in 2015, bringing nearly 20 years of experience facilitating data- and trauma-informed safety strategies that center the voices of survivors.

Problem
“Nearly every survivor I’ve worked with…one of the first things they’ll say after talking about the resources they need, ‘I just want what happened to us…to not happen to anyone else.’
Solution
“Trauma Recovery Centers, inter-generational healing, and really scaling up the drivers of safety is what survivors want investments in.”

A conversation with activist and actor Jenifer Lewis and CSJ Executive Director

spanish

Join activist and actor Jenifer Lewis and CSJ Executive Director Tinisch Hollins for an honest conversation about safe solutions. They discuss key factors that make us safe, and remind us to dream beyond the confines of incarceration and enforcement. When everyone’s supported, everyone’s safe.

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Watch Video spanish
Hear the real-life stories from “Just Safe” participants beyond the numbers.
Marisa
SHARED SAFETY

Safe means to me…

As the CSJ California Innovations Director and originator of the phrase “Safety is more than the absence of crime, it is the presence of well being,” Marisa works with crime survivors, system leaders, and community advocates across California to advance Shared Safety—a framework of principles and practices that cities can use to reimagine community safety. Marisa joined Californians for Safety and Justice in 2015, bringing nearly 20 years of experience facilitating data- and trauma-informed safety strategies that center the voices of survivors.
Laura
Victim Compensation

Safe means to me…

When Laura’s son Sean was fatally shot by police in June 2020, she and her two daughters fought for over two years to bring justice to his memory. The officer who pulled the trigger was fired in October 2022, allowing Laura and her family to feel like things were finally starting to move forward in the fight for justice.
David
SUBSTANCE TREATMENT

Safe means to me…

David was 10 years old when he lost his brother to a murder in 1983. No one told him what happened, and David struggled in his teen years with fear and anger about the loss. After decades of drug and alcohol addiction, David became clean and sober. In 2012, loss struck David’s family again when another one of his brothers was killed. David helped his family navigate this ordeal and has developed first-hand expertise in the needs people have after experiencing trauma.
Serafín
Trauma Recovery

Safe means to me…

In 1986, Serafín experienced loss when his mentor and brother were murdered in the streets of Los Angeles. In a state of grief, Serafín began to run into trouble with the law. After serving close to 5 years of his adolescence behind concrete walls, Serafín recognized a cycle of violence. Today, Serafín is passionate about giving back to the California community. He has worked for several community-based organizations and nonprofits including Taller San José, The Boys & Girls Club, The City of Santa Ana, Canyon Acres-Wraparound, and more.
ELIZABETH
PREVENTION

Safe means to me…

Elizabeth is a project consultant on adult and juvenile justice system reform efforts. Elizabeth was formerly the Director of Rehabilitative Programs at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. While in that position, she oversaw education, substance abuse treatment, and other rehabilitative programs for the state’s incarceration and parole systems.
Vinny
MENTAL HEALTH

Safe means to me…

Vinny is a community organizer based in California. He has been involved in the activism world for over a decade and has been a part of several survivor-led coalitions to advance dignity and support families impacted by police violence. Ten years ago, Vinny’s sister Jazmyne was unjustly killed by four police officers in the waiting room of a mental health clinic while she was experiencing a crisis. Her death inspired him to fight for safe solutions.
Tell us what safe means to you…

Story

Hidden
What are the first three words you think of when you hear the word safe?
GILBERT & Joshua
FAMILY Healing

Safe means to me…

Gilbert Johnson serves as ASJ’s California TimeDone Manager, working to build safer communities by eliminating barriers to success and increasing economic stability for millions of people living with arrest records and convictions. He works with thousands of previously incarcerated individuals and system-impacted families to change laws, change records, and change the narrative about people living with old records. Gilbert is a perfect example of the positive change that can occur when you give people struggling with addiction, gang involvement, and criminal convictions the chance to grow and excel.
INGRID
REENTRY SERVICES

Safe means to me…

As a survivor of domestic violence and a formerly incarcerated person, Ingrid is a single mom who uses her story to inspire others to create positive change. Ingrid shared that finding her confidence is an important part of being able to feel safe.
Tell us what safe means to you…

Story

Hidden
What are the first three words you think of when you hear the word safe?
Hear the real-life stories from “Just Safe” participants beyond the numbers.
Serafín
Trauma Recovery

Safe means to me…

In 1986, Serafín experienced loss when his mentor and brother were murdered in the streets of Los Angeles. In a state of grief, Serafín began to run into trouble with the law. After serving close to 5 years of his adolescence behind concrete walls, Serafín recognized a cycle of violence. Today, Serafín is passionate about giving back to the California community. He has worked for several community-based organizations and nonprofits including Taller San José, The Boys & Girls Club, The City of Santa Ana, Canyon Acres-Wraparound, and more.
ELIZABETH
PREVENTION

Safe means to me…

Elizabeth is a project consultant on adult and juvenile justice system reform efforts. Elizabeth was formerly the Director of Rehabilitative Programs at the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. While in that position, she oversaw education, substance abuse treatment, and other rehabilitative programs for the state’s incarceration and parole systems.
Marisa
SHARED SAFETY

Safe means to me…

As the CSJ California Innovations Director and originator of the phrase “Safety is more than the absence of crime, it is the presence of well being,” Marisa works with crime survivors, system leaders, and community advocates across California to advance Shared Safety—a framework of principles and practices that cities can use to reimagine community safety. Marisa joined Californians for Safety and Justice in 2015, bringing nearly 20 years of experience facilitating data- and trauma-informed safety strategies that center the voices of survivors.
Laura
Victim Compensation

Safe means to me…

When Laura’s son Sean was fatally shot by police in June 2020, she and her two daughters fought for over two years to bring justice to his memory. The officer who pulled the trigger was fired in October 2022, allowing Laura and her family to feel like things were finally starting to move forward in the fight for justice.
INGRID
REENTRY SERVICES

Safe means to me…

As a survivor of domestic violence and a formerly incarcerated person, Ingrid is a single mom who uses her story to inspire others to create positive change. Ingrid shared that finding her confidence is an important part of being able to feel safe.
David
SUBSTANCE TREATMENT

Safe means to me…

David was 10 years old when he lost his brother to a murder in 1983. No one told him what happened, and David struggled in his teen years with fear and anger about the loss. After decades of drug and alcohol addiction, David became clean and sober. In 2012, loss struck David’s family again when another one of his brothers was killed. David helped his family navigate this ordeal and has developed first-hand expertise in the needs people have after experiencing trauma.
Vinny
MENTAL HEALTH

Safe means to me…

Vinny is a community organizer based in California. He has been involved in the activism world for over a decade and has been a part of several survivor-led coalitions to advance dignity and support families impacted by police violence. Ten years ago, Vinny’s sister Jazmyne was unjustly killed by four police officers in the waiting room of a mental health clinic while she was experiencing a crisis. Her death inspired him to fight for safe solutions.
GILBERT & Joshua
FAMILY Healing

Safe means to me…

Gilbert Johnson serves as ASJ’s California TimeDone Manager, working to build safer communities by eliminating barriers to success and increasing economic stability for millions of people living with arrest records and convictions. He works with thousands of previously incarcerated individuals and system-impacted families to change laws, change records, and change the narrative about people living with old records. Gilbert is a perfect example of the positive change that can occur when you give people struggling with addiction, gang involvement, and criminal convictions the chance to grow and excel.